A financial planner has a 3-step exercise for anyone who’s worried about the worst-case scenario

America is in a severe state of economic, social, and political unrest. 

If you’re especially worried about your money and what threats the future could bring, you’re not alone.

More than 43 million Americans have lost work over the last three months. While emergency federal aid in the form of a $600 boost to unemployment benefits and $1,200 stimulus checks bolstered personal incomes and led to a heightened savings rate, that’s temporary relief. It’s unclear what lagging effects the coronavirus pandemic could have on our wallets in six months or a year from now. 

It may be overwhelming to think about what else could go wrong and how you might react to it, but that’s actually one of the most effective ways to plan for the future, says Brian Fry, a certified financial planner and the founder of Safe Landing Financial.

Learn more about this: A financial planner has a 3-step exercise for anyone who’s worried about the worst-case scenario

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